Four Signs to Look for that Will Reveal St. Hildegard’s Fifth Era has Arrived

The five symbolic beasts in St. Hildegard’s vision represent unique and brief historical ages which occur in a specific sequence. They also represent a particular evil evident in the social context of each period. This affliction of evil is engineered by Satan and intended to progressively damage the Church in preparation of the coming of the Antichrist.

In my book, The Five Beasts of St. Hildegard: Prophetic Symbols of Modern Society, I demonstrate that the first three eras have already passed and that we are currently in the latter half of the fourth era, that of the Black Pig. Four signs will clearly manifest to us that the present era is ending and the final era, the Grey Wolf, is emerging:

1. A change in the world’s geopolitical composition.

belinwall2The five periods represent first and foremost separate historical eras. Dividing the 20th century into separate eras is very easy for historians to accomplish (it is not always so simple); the years 1914, 1945, and 1991 were natural divisions based on a change in the map of Europe, as well as its power structure. Western Europe since 1945 has been protected by America through the NATO alliance and the presence of American bases. Since 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Empire, America’s been the sole hegemon in the region. America will soon lose that privilege; the writing is on the wall. I explain why in an earlier post, The End of American Hegemony.

2. Political turmoil in Western Europe.

parisburningIn Hildegard’s description of the era she refers to revolutions but does not describe them in any detail. She makes no mention here of wars between countries, but perhaps hints at them in a later chapter in Scivias. Some Europeans can be expected to violently turn on their governments as the era of the Grey Wolf begins. Continue reading “Four Signs to Look for that Will Reveal St. Hildegard’s Fifth Era has Arrived”

The Reappearance of St. Hildegard After 800 years and Her Gift to Today’s Church

Hildegard picSt. Hildegard (1098-1179) is the perfect subject for the study of Catholic mystical literature; there are simply no red flags associated with her. We know precisely who she is, a twelfth-century nun born into a noble family and who, because of her visionary gift, was given as a child to be raised by the Church and eventually became an abbess. She is not only a saint but a Doctor of the Church. Her writing was prolific, covering her extraordinary visions of salvation history, medicine, and even music composition. We also have hundreds of her letters; she corresponded with kings, queens, popes, abbots, nuns, etc.

Hildegard was left out of the history books and it is not clear why. She fell into obscurity shortly after her death. She was rediscovered in the late twentieth century by Latin scholars looking for new material for their students; her Latin works were first translated into English in the late 1980s. She was elevated to Doctor of the Church in 2012 by Pope Benedict XVI. It is as though she came back after 800 years of obscurity to continue her service to the Church in a world she had described for us in her vision of five beasts, which she explained were symbols of the last days (vision 11 from her book, Scivias, Latin, “Know the Ways“)

In her letters one thing stands out as an urgent priority, the call to holiness and purity. They clearly show that for Hildegard a spiritual battle was raging in the twelfth-century, particularly with regard to corruption and immorality among the clergy. She writes with impressive authority:

“The Spirit of God says earnestly: ‘Oh shepherds, wail and mourn over the present time, because you do not know what you are doing when you sweep aside the duties established by God in favor of opportunities for money and the foolishness of wicked men who do not fear God.’  And so your malicious curses and threatening words are not to be obeyed. You have raised up your rods of punishment arrogantly, not to serve God but to gratify your own perverted will.” [Letter to Heinrich, Archbishop of Mainz. Baird, Joseph L. The Personal Correspondence of Hildegard of Bingen. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006, p.42.]

The correspondence on the whole gives evidence of her personal saintliness and tireless commitment to the reform of the Church. Continue reading “The Reappearance of St. Hildegard After 800 years and Her Gift to Today’s Church”

The Era of the Grey Wolf and Islam

picture grey wolfSt. Hildegard describes the era of the Grey Wolf in greater detail than she does the other eras. I discussed some aspects of the era in an earlier post. Unlike her descriptions of the previous four, which in my book I am able to compare to the actual histories of those periods, this era lies ahead of us. Hildegard’s explanation of the symbolism of the animal gives us a glimpse of what to expect in the decades ahead.

Hildegard’s world was essentially Europe and the Mediterranean, and according to her vision, it will soon be a world marked by widespread civil unrest. It will also be a time of persecution against Christians by, she states, a specific group of people. She also gives us several clues as to who this group might be.

Continue reading “The Era of the Grey Wolf and Islam”